Positive or Negative?

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Think About It
When you speak to others, you are also talking to yourself. Consequently, be careful about what you say and always say it in a positive way. Sometimes people are speaking negatively and think they are speaking positively. For example; how many times have you heard someone, OR even yourself say, “I have to go to work” or “I have to get up early in the morning” or  “No problem” or “Not too bad?” These are all habitual phrases that are said without stopping to think about their negative connotation.

“I Have to Go to Work.”
No you don’t; unless you’re serving a prison sentence somewhere it is a privilege to go to work. People sometimes work very hard to get a job, and shortly thereafter are heard saying, “I have to go to work.” Develop the habit of saying, “I get to go to work.”  You do; Right? The next time you hear yourself saying that you have to go to work, stop to think how you would feel if you did not have a job or business to go to.

“Not TOO Bad.”
Just how bad is it?

“No Problem.”
I remain grateful to Pam Chambers for catching me on that one, and pointing out that this phrase is actually a double negative; “No” and “Problem.” That was quite a while ago. I have since conditioned myself to say, “My pleasure.” Doesn’t that sound better?

Get It? What can YOU think of that I missed on this list? Post it as a comment and I will add it to the list.

Added in Comments:

“Try:”
“I’ll try to get those numbers to you by the end of the day.” The word “try” does not imply success. “We’ll try to attend your dinner party.” You might as well invite someone else.

“No:”
“No, your business cards won’t be ready until Friday.” “No” is such a negative word. How about, “I wish I could have them for you sooner. They’ll be ready by noon on Friday.”

Mahalo to Pam Chambers for the “No” and “Try” additions”

3 Responses to “Positive or Negative?”

  1. Pam Chambers Says:

    Try: “I’ll try to get those numbers to you by the end of the day.” The word “try” does not imply success. “We’ll try to attend your dinner party.” You might as well invite someone else.

    No: “No, your business cards won’t be ready until Friday.” “No” is such a negative word. How about, “I wish I could have them for you sooner. They’ll be ready by noon on Friday.”

  2. Abdul Moghrabi Says:

    I agree with the precision of communication, and more often than none, we hear the phrase. I discussed this point with my boss yesterday about one disgruntled employee and told him that workers at Rapport should feel privileged to work here, because they are introduced to a world that they wouldn’t otherwise see or know about, especially in the intricate way that they do. Moreover, our showroom resembles a gallery or a museum of fine pieces exquisitly arranged to provide a stunning visual while maintaining the comfort of a home- a high end home… I look forward to coming to work despite the challenges, because my place of employment offered me an opportunity that I wouldn’t otherwise have deserved.

  3. Tammy Says:

    No problem has long been my biggest issue. until you had told me previously the issues with it, I used it often. I am trying to no use it any more… and thank you for the reminder.

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