Archive for the 'Success' Category

Words that Justify Procrastination

Sunday, August 6th, 2017

“In a few minutes.”

“Tomorrow.”
“Next week.”
“Next month.”
“Next year.”
“Next lifetime.”

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W. Clement Stone, founder of Combined Insurance Company in Chicago had the solution to this “mental sickness” when he simply said, “DO IT NOW!”

This is a shirt that I had made for “Clem” after he came to visit me in my Hollywood office in the mid ’70s.
Mr. Stone lived to be 100 years old.

RIP Clem

SELL QUALITY; NOT PRICE

Saturday, July 15th, 2017

This was published in a Vancouver, BC Newspaper in 2007:

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Your Reputation

Tuesday, July 4th, 2017

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“Under Construction”
Like the braids of straw that make up a basket, your reputation is woven into how you are perceived. It gets stronger or weaker, better or worse with everything you do and how you do it.
Your reputation is how people think of you, and how they describe you to others.
Every deed well done leaves a positive image of you. Any deed done poorly or left undone does exactly the opposite.
When people talk about you, (and they will) any negatives are likely to get more attention than the positives. One little negative has the potential of negating all of the big positives you have done.

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It Starts Here:
Trust yourself to ALWAYS:
-Be On Time
-Do What You Said You Would
-Tell the Truth

And commit yourself to the KGB - Keep Getting Better

AGAIN It’s Over

Friday, June 30th, 2017

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A Short Story
The end of each day brings about the opportunity to look back and think about what you achieved today.
Some days that will be more than others… Some days you will be smiling at the end, other days you may not be.
In any case it’s time to begin a new one.
The end of each month brings about the opportunity to reflect on your goals. Whether you hit them or not, it’s time to set new ones for the next month.
Start on day 1 to do the things needed to end this month as you would like to.
The end of a relationship gives you the opportunity to analyze what you may have done wrong that created its end.
If this was a relationship you treasured, think about behavioral changes you can make to the next one. If its one you are happy to get out of, be thankful and don’t look back.
The end of each life brings about the opportunity for friends and family to gather and talk about your life and what you did while still alive.
You are writing your legacy while you are still drawing breath. Do now what you would like others to say you did.
In the end, any ending is simply a new beginning.

A Short Story

Thursday, June 29th, 2017

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The end of each month brings about the opportunity to reflect on your goals. Whether you hit them or not, it’s time to set new ones for the next month. Start on day 1 to do the things needed to end this month as you would like to.

The end of a relationship gives you the opportunity to analyze what you may have done wrong that created its end. If this was a relationship you treasured, think about behavioral changes you can make to the next one. If its one you are happy to get out of, be thankful and don’t look back.

The end of each life brings about the opportunity for friends and family to gather and talk about your life and what you did while still alive.

You are writing your legacy while you are still drawing breath. Do now what you would like others to say you did.

In the end, any ending is simply a new beginning.

Going the Extra 5,000 Miles

Sunday, June 11th, 2017

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Rapport Racing Over the Rockies

When I was a fledgling businessman in the ’60s I read a great book; MINDING THE STORE by Stanley Marcus; founder of Nieman Marcus. He tells a story about being the only person in his Dallas headquarters early one Sunday morning. He was there catching up on mail when the phone rang. Some people in his position would not pick up the phone, but he did.

There was a woman on then other end calling from Houston who was furious that the dishes she ordered did not arrive, and that she had guests coming for a dinner party that afternoon.

What did Stanley Marcus do? 

He put a duplicate order in his car and drove the 240 miles to Houston (four hours away) and delivered her dishes personally in time for her dinner party. Needless to say, she became a customer for life. That’s Service!

 

I received an e-mail this morning (Sunday) from Peter Skaaning in Beverly Hills. Peter is the owner of Rapport International Furniture. He said that he got an irate call from a customer in Wisconsin, 2,500 miles away saying that her furniture had not arrived and that she needed it NOW! 

What did Peter Skaaning do?

In his e-mail he said that he asked himself, “What would Ron do? He said that the answer came immediately. He packed a duplicate order in the company truck along with two of his delivery employees and sent them off to Wisconsin (5,000 miles round-trip) with instructions to “Make this Customer Happy.” I’m certain that they will, and that this little “mistake” will generate a customer for life, 2,500 miles away. 

 

There’s a chapter in SUCCESS MADE EASY titled STUFF HAPPENS. Yes, I cleaned it up a little for the book. The point is that “Stuff” happens to everyone, and it’s what you do with it that determines the outcome much more than the “stuff” itself.

 

WORDS!

Saturday, November 19th, 2016

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Yes They Do!
The things you say to people have the power to hurt them, help them, heal them, to encourage or motivate them. Choose your words wisely since no one wants to be hurt. And, it’s so easy to do.

Hurtful words:
“I told you so.”
“Why did you do that?”

Helpful Words:
“I’m here for you.”
“What can I do to help?”

Healing Words:
“You will feel better tomorrow.”
“This too will pass.”
“I love you.”

Encouraging Words:
“You can do it!”
“I know you can.”

Motivational Words:
“Go for It.”
“You have what it takes.”

Add some of our own, but most importantly,

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“Think before you speak.”

A Real Pro

Thursday, November 3rd, 2016

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Goosebumps
I got goosebumps while watching game six of The World Series when the TV commentator said, “The late, great Jim Fregosi said, ‘Sometimes you have to know how to lose.’” Jim Fregosi was my first business partner in the mid ‘60s.

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Late and Great
Jimmy was playing shortstop for the California Angels and was the highest paid shortstop in the American League at the time. He was a real celebrity, especially in Anaheim.
We literally could not go into a bar or restaurant where he was not known and sought after for autographs. It was a real treat to be with him and get to know him. I had the pleasure of going to Palm Springs with the Angels and sit in the dugout during their spring training games.
I learned a lot of things from Jimmy, perhaps the most important was the difference between professionals and amateurs in anything. Following is the best single example of the lessons he taught me.

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“WHY!”
We were having lunch at a restaurant in Anaheim one day and he said, “I need to get out to the ballpark and take batting practice.” I hated to see him leave and said, “Jimmy, why do you have to take batting practice? All you’ve done your whole life is hit baseballs.” His response changed my life.

Jimmy said, “Ron, we do not take batting practice to learn how to hit, we all know how to hit the ball. I cannot help it, on the way to the ballpark I have a little bit of Little Jimmy (his son) going on in my head, a little bit of Jan (his then wife) going on in my head, a little bit of last night’s game going on, and I will probably have a little bit of this lunch going on. He then went on to say, “But, to play at this level you can’t have anything else on your mind than tonight’s game. When we put on the uniform and go out on the field to take batting practice everything else goes away and we get focused on why were here tonight.”

The words that continue to give me goosebumps are, “To play at this level.”
The difference between Jimmy and many of his teammates was that he knew WHY they take batting practice. He told went on two say, “When you know HOW to do your job you can keep it, when you know WHY you can become the Manager.”

When Jimmy eventually became too old to hit baseballs he was made manager of the California Angels and then went on to manage several other big lead baseball teams. GOOGLE him. Jimmy died on Valentine’s Day two years ago and I watched television all day as they showed reruns of some of his best performances at bat and on the field.

RIP Jimmy

“I”

Saturday, October 22nd, 2016

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There’s No “I” in Teamwork

This question was sent to my website from a student at Brigham Young University.

“I was at a seminar at the Polynesian Cultural Center that Ron put on. He talked about the Master Mind Alliance. I was wondering if I could get the quote for that? I took notes but they weren’t as good as the way he said it. Thank you in advance.”

Sincerely,
Amber Rasmussen

My Reply:

“Whenever two or more minds come together, with a common goal, and in a spirit of harmony, there is an invisible mind created. That invisible mind; the Master Mind is more powerful than the sum total of the individual minds, and then feeds the individual minds with ideas, hunches, motivation, inspiration and everything needed to be great.”

Professionals and Amateurs

Wednesday, September 14th, 2016

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Professionals and amateurs can be found in all walks of life; sports, business, law, medicine, the arts, and of course in sales.

Googling; I found that professionals have certain things in common:
Professionals maintain a high standard of ethics, behavior and work activities as either an employee or self-employed person.
Professionals put the interest of the client ahead of their own interests.
Professionals demonstrate a high level of work morale and motivation.
Professionals have interest and desire to do a job well while holding a positive attitude towards al aspects of the job at hand.
Professionals treat relationships with colleagues in the most respectful manner at all times.
Professionals subject themselves to strict codes of conduct enshrining rigorous ethical and moral obligations.

There are also some distinct differences between professionals and amateurs:

Professionals perform at a HIGHER LEVEL than amateurs do.
Professionals stand out; amateurs blend in.
Professionals know how and why they should do things; amateurs only know how.
Professionals work when they need to; amateurs when they feel like it.
Professionals go to work because they want to; amateurs because they have to.
Professionals start a new project as soon as they finish the current one; amateurs give themselves a well deserved a break as soon as they can.
Professionals take pride in their work; amateurs don’t really care.
Professionals don’t have time for endless tinkering; amateurs can tinker all day if allowed to.
Professionals judge their work by results; amateurs by their efforts.
Professionals make deadlines; amateurs avoid deadlines.
Professionals accept, even embrace criticism; amateurs become hostile when criticized.
Professionals think big; amateurs think small.
Professionals solve problems, amateurs make excuses.
Professionals visualize success; amateurs fear failure.
Professionals practice; amateurs don’t need to.
Professionals remain students; amateurs graduate prematurely.
Professionals understand the importance of attitude and commitment; amateurs think it’s all luck.
Professionals make it look easy; amateurs are convinced that it’s hard.
Professionals learn from their mistakes; amateurs deny them.
Professionals see opportunities everywhere; amateurs overlook them.
Professionals are even tempered; amateurs quick tempered.
Professionals are patient; amateurs impatient.
Professionals are organized; amateurs disorganized
Professionals arrive early; amateurs on time at best